First Wedding Video

Several weeks ago I videotaped a wedding. My friend Lezlie referred the couple to me, and I accepted. I’ve always said no to that sort of thing because I’ve heard horror stories about bridezillas, but even moreso because it matters: I don’t want to be the guy that people point at and say, “That’s him…that’s the man that fucked up the record of the most important day of my life.”

There is a man named Mark with whom I have kept a casual friendship for a few years. My brother knows him: they both work for Entercom Radio/Media. We’ve met once in person, and stayed in touch through Facebook, and I knew through that venue that he’d recently purchased a set of studio lights. I sent him a message, asking if that was true. He wrote back, “Yes, why?”

I don’t know why I did it, but it was an inspired choice to contact him. My initial thought was to just ask if I could rent his lights. The question was typed and sent before my brain registered the action: “Want to help me shoot a wedding?”

I didn’t even know he had a video camera – as it turns out he has two. Between the two of us, we ended up with four cameras to shoot the wedding: bride-cam (static), groom-cam (static), Mark-cam (mobile), Me-cam (mobile). The plan ended up being to let the two front cameras capture the entire service from different angles at a fixed point of view; that would be the foundation. Then, Mark and I with our two cameras moved from place to place, capturing whatever looked interesting: reaction shots from the congregation; the ring bearer (cute but precocious kid) handing the ring to the best man; the scripture readings; things like that.

A year ago, I might have called a couple of old friends to help me with this, and I would have been nervous the entire time, wondering if they were capturing what I needed. They’re really good behind a camera, if they have very strong direction, but if you just point them in a direction and push to get them started, they will eventually wander. Their idea of “good enough” is nowhere near mine.

I finally saw his footage after finally getting a card reader and downloading it, and my impression from watching him at the service was correct: he paid attention – very close attention – and captured everything I needed him to. It was like dancing: we each just moved with the “music” of the service and reception in a loose step, me leading, him following from across the room. He even caught some moments I didn’t expect, but were absolutely beautiful choices: a close-up of the organist’s hands for instance.

Adobe Premiere Multi-Camera Monitor

The groom said to us at the reception: “Man, you guys were everywhere and nowhere.” That was the best compliment he could have given us. The priest even thanked us for our discretion at staying unobtrusive.

I learned through this process that Adobe Premiere has a multi-camera feature, where it will place four separate tracks of video into an interface where you can watch them simultaneously and pick and choose your shots on the fly. It saved me hours of time I’m sure.

I’ve nearly done editing. The finished product looks amazing.

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